Short Acting Contraception

Short Acting contraception options must be used regularly. They can be very effective if you use them on a strict schedule. 

Injection
(Depo Provera
)

Depo Shot

94-99.8% effective
Lasts 12 weeks

Commonly known as the 'Depo shot,' the hormonal injection is given in your arm or bottom every 12 to 14 weeks by a GP or nurse.  

The injection contains the hormone progesterone, which stops ovulation and makes the fluid at the opening of your uterus (the cervix) thicker, stopping sperm from getting through.  

Your period may become lighter or stop altogether, and you may experience less painful periods.  

It is safe to use if you are breastfeeding, and is not affected by other medications.  

More information:
Better Health Channel
Family Planning Victoria

Oral Contraceptives (The Pill)

Pill icon

93-99% effective
Take daily 

There are two types of oral contraceptives: 

You use oral contraceptives by swallowing one pill at the same time or around the same time every day. 

Most come in a 28-day pack, and are available with a prescription from your GP.  There are many different types and brands of the pill. 

Your period may become lighter, more regular, or can be skipped, and you may experience less painful periods.  

Only the Mini Pill is safely recommended to use if you are breastfeeding.  

The Pill can affect other medications, so let your doctor know if you are taking any other medications. 

More information:
Better Health Channel
Better Health Channel
Family Planning Victoria
Family Planning Victoria

Vaginal Ring
(NuvaRing
)

Vaginal Ring

91-99% effective
Lasts 3 weeks 

The vaginal ring is sold as the NuvaRing® in Australia.  

It is a soft silicone ring that you self-insert into your vagina (as easy to put in as a tampon). It sits in your vagina for 3 weeks and is removed for 7 days so you can have a period, or you can use it back-to-back to skip your periods.  

It comes in a pack of 3 and must be kept refrigerated. They are available at most pharmacies with a prescription from your GP.  

It slowly and steadily releases two hormones, estrogen and progestogen, which stop your ovaries from releasing an egg each month. It also thickens the fluid in your cervix to help prevent sperm from entering your uterus.  

Most people and their partners cannot feel the ring once it's inserted.  

Your period may become lighter, more regular and you may experience less painful periods.  

It is not affected by other medications.  

More information:
Better Health Channel
Family Planning Victoria